ExactSource Continues Strategic Growth with Announcement of Market Expansion and New Talent

Posted by Sarah Walpert on Tue, Feb 21, 2017 @ 14:02 PM

ExactSource, a leader in the delivery of talent management solutions to architectural and engineering firms, welcomes nationally-recognized A/E/C executive, Mike Wagner, to their growing team, amidst announcement of a market expansion into Texas and surrounding areas.

ES_logo_large.jpgExactSource, a nationally recognized leader in the delivery of talent management solutions to architectural and engineering firms, welcomes Mike Wagner to their expanding team. Wagner is a 30-year veteran Marketing and Business Development Executive with extensive experience in strategic planning, client development, firm expansion, and marketing functions for A/E/C industry firms. He will serve as Partner.

Wagner is a specialist in relationship-selling and building successful marketing/business development organizations, systems, and processes to improve branding, recognition, and enhance seller-doer results for firms in the architectural and engineering industries. He will lead business and client development for A/E/C firms seeking to fill senior and executive-level positions in management, production, marketing, and business development. Wagner will lead ExactSource's growth in Texas and surrounding geographical markets.

“I’m thrilled to welcome Mike Wagner as the newest Partner at ExactSource,” says Managing Partner Katy Young, “His unique blend of experience working internally with A/E/C firms in the business development and marketing departments perfectly lends itself to the expansion of not only our discipline expertise, but also our geographic reach within the Southwest market."

The addition of Mr. Wagner and the geographic expansion is a strategic transition for ExactSource, a firm who has experienced significant growth in the last six months. In October of 2016, the A/E/C recruiting firm announced the addition of industry influencer Chuck Detling to their team, as well as their entry into the forensic engineering market.

This recent growth is part of a larger strategy to continue better serving the A/E/C industry with a comprehensive suite of talent management solutions. ExactSource leadership credits the firm's recent successes to the diverse experiences and skill sets of their growing team.

Ms. Young explains, "Mr. Wagner, an industry veteran, adds a deep level of expertise to our team; he is a unique complement. His wealth of knowledge in marketing and business development strategies will be a resource for our clients which will be invaluable in the selection of high caliber talent at the senior level."

Mike Wagner contact banner (1).png

About ExactSource:

ExactSource is a national leader in the delivery of talent solutions, software and organizational consulting to firms in the architectural and engineering sector. The company was launched in April 2012, by its sister company, Matteson Partners, one of Atlanta's leading Executive Search firms for the past 29 years. In 2014, ExactSource launched Ingenium, the premier boutique digital marketing agency for professional service firms.

ExactSource is best known in the A/E/C industry for their highly acclaimed ExactProfile technology, a system released in 2012 that assesses and catalogs more than 115 critical engineering skill sets and experience levels that aren’t typically identified on a resume. Using this breakthrough screening software, HR managers are able to instantly identify the technical candidates that meet their exact requirements. This methodology provides a smarter way to hire, and it is the objective of ExactSource to have every A/E/C firm across the country using ExactProfiles as part of the hiring process.

ExactSource brings a combined 161 years of experience in technical and leadership recruitment, and has established a prominent presence in the Engineering community. The company successfully serves firms in 39 states across the nation, including over 20 firms on the Top 500 A/E list.

For more information about ExactSource and their consulting, research, software, and recruiting services, visit their website or contact David Schmidt at dschmidt(at)exactsource(dot)com.

Click here to see the original press release, as published on PRWeb.

Topics: News from ExactSource, marketing, employees, new hires, Job Market, press release, business development, market expansion, ExactSource in Texas, A/E/C Executive

Preparing for a Career as an Expert Witness: Developing Fundamental Investigation Skills [Part 2]

Posted by Chuck Detling on Tue, Nov 22, 2016 @ 09:11 AM
Blog Title Graphic- Career as Expert Witness (series) (1).png

As part of our recent expansion and launch of the Forensic Engineering practice area, we are publishing a weekly series on "Preparing for a Career as an Expert Witness." Click here for more information on our forensic engineering recruiting solutions.

Forensic engineers are called upon to analyze various calamities involving injuries or significant property losses, including car accidents, building collapses, fires, explosions, and industrial accidents. Not only do these investigations require sound engineering skills, but they also require myriad technical skills, including the ability to document an accident scene for later. Failure to document an accident scene properly can lead to catastrophic results if incorrect measurements, photographs, and notes are relied on when forming an opinion to be given at trial. Many forensic engineers believe these skills can only be learned “on the job” through trial and error. However, taking a proactive approach to developing these skills can pay off immensely as you prepare for a career in forensic engineering.

Here are 3 ways to begin developing your fundamental investigative skills:



 

1. Learn how to take a good measurement

In engineering, measurement, accuracy and precision are paramount. Here are six guiding principles of good measurement practice:
  • Plan your investigation in advance, taking into account the types of measurements you will likely be taking, the terrain, temperature, and the amount of time you’ll be allocated. Bring the proper measurement tools to an accident scene. It's better to have a tool and not need it then the other way around.
  • Understand how to calibrate each piece of equipment you will be using and check calibration against a known reference value on site if possible, even if you’ve already calibrated your equipment in the lab. Error is sometimes OK. Mistakes are not. Operator mistakes can be avoided by working carefully through a procedure and checking work. Tolerances are NOT uncertainties – tolerances are acceptance limits chosen for a process or product.
  • Measurement results need to be written down clearly. Be consistent in your use of unit symbols, etc.
  • Know why you're taking the measurement. A measurement is only useful if it is suitable for the intended purpose. It's important to understand the difference between precision and accuracy.
  • Understand how environmental conditions and the type of measuring equipment you have might affect your results.
  • Use the same procedure for each type of measurement and use procedures consistent with others in your company so that the results can be reproduced. 

Finally, never estimate the power of practice, practice, practice. Understand how to use each piece of equipment. Take various measurements under different conditions and compare them to controlled results to better understand how external influences (including fatigue and conspicuity) might affect your measurements.

2. Learn how to take a good picture

A DSLR camera is still probably the first choice for most forensic engineers.  Obviously, it is critical that you understand how to operate the camera and change settings as needed. Again, practice is key. Competent accident scene photos possess many of the following characteristics: They are correctly exposed, have maximum depth of field, are free from distortion, and are in sharp focus. Although there are often conditions that make this difficult or impossible (e.g., close-up photographs will always have shallow depth of field) there are ways to maximize success. For example, use a grounded platform like a tripod  to stop vibrations caused by human interaction with the camera. Ensure the camera shutter is controlled by remote to further decrease the chance of vibration.

It's important to take into account that modern cameras record images digitally. Best practice is to record images in a lossless compression format (RAW) as opposed to .jpg or other formats.

Finally, just as with other aspects of your investigation, planning is critical. With today's digital cameras, its easy to snap several hundred pictures (no film to pay for) and then hope that you’ve captured everything you need. This practice is reckless and can often times lead to poor results. Instead, learn basic photograph composition skills to connect each of the disparate objects in a scene into a cohesive photo or set of photos. Log all of your photos in sequential order and note any circumstances that might be important.

3. Learn how to take good notes.

The notes you take at a scene will be critical in tying together the photos and measurements to provide an overall assessment. Don’t assume that your notes will only be seen by you or your colleagues. It is very likely that these notes, along with your photos and measurements, will need to be made available to adverse parties. They should be neat, organized, and possess an air of professionalism. Sketches should be neat, with a scale, and other references if appropriate. If any evidence is taken into custody then this should be noted and appropriate chain-of-custody documentation should be used.



CONCLUSION:

There are many ways to begin developing your investigative skills beyond trial and error, "on the job" training. By taking a proactive approach to learning these necessary skills in your down time, you will gain a leg up on the competition in the job market as you prepare for a career as an expert witness.
 

Chuck Detling heads the forensic engineering practice at ExactSource. He can be contacted at cdetling@exactsource.com

 
Chuck_FE_practice_lead.png


 

Topics: Job Skills, technical skills, forensic engineering, crime scene, accident scene

Preparing for a career as an expert witness: Building a record of publication [Part I]

Posted by Chuck Detling on Tue, Nov 15, 2016 @ 08:11 AM
Blog Title Graphic- Career as Expert Witness (series).png

As part of our recent expansion and launch of the Forensic Engineering practice area, we are publishing a weekly series on "Preparing for a Career as an Expert Witness." Click here for more information on our forensic engineering recruiting solutions.

Building a record of publication that ultimately includes a feature in a peer-reviewed journal is a great way to establish yourself as a subject matter expert. Oftentimes, the most difficult part of the process is knowing how to get started. However, there are a few steps you can take to build your record of publication while you perfect your writing style and become more comfortable with your subject matter. 

Here are 3 ways to start working on your body of work before you publish your first peer-reviewed article:



 

1.Book reviews

Book reviews are an excellent way to make your debut into the scholarly publication world while adding an important component to your CV. The best way to find potential books you can review is by contacting journal review editors directly to ask about books they would like reviewed. In the internet age, there are many thousands of books printed every year and there’s no way modern journals can review them all. Signing up for a listserv in your area of expertise might help, as these email lists oftentimes send out calls for reviewers. 

2.Industry Conferences

Industry Conferences not only provide a good way to network and keep up on current events in your field, but they also provide opportunities to present your paper for publication. Like the proliferation of books, there are now thousands of conferences every year on every scientific and engineering topic imaginable. Find a conference in your field and approach the organizers about presenting your paper. If your presentation is successful, you might be asked to present your paper for consideration for publication. In fact, it’s not unusual for conferences to publish edited volumes of all the papers presented during a given conference. 

3. White Papers & E-books

In the pre-internet age, this was not a viable option. But today, anyone can be their own publisher. If you work in an organization, ask if it’s possible for you to draft a white-paper for internal use on a subject matter relevant to your business. While not technically a ‘published’ document, it’s certainly OK to include this paper on a CV as a demonstration of your knowledge of the subject matter. Ready to go a step farther? Take your work and publish it on-line as an e-book. There are many many resources on-line that can help you format and publish your paper for the world to see.



CONCLUSION:

It’s never too early in your career to begin building a record of publication. Now, get out there and do it.
 

Chuck Detling heads the forensic engineering practice at ExactSource. He can be contacted at cdetling@exactsource.com

 
Chuck_FE_practice_lead.png


 

Topics: tips for communicators, forensic engineering, content creation

ExactSource Expands into New Market Amidst Rapid Growth and the Addition of Industry Influencer

Posted by Sarah Walpert on Wed, Oct 19, 2016 @ 09:10 AM

ExactSource, a nationally recognized leader in the delivery of talent management solutions to architectural and engineering firms, welcomes forensic engineering expert Chuck Detling to their rapidly expanding team.

ExactSource, a nationally recognized leader in the delivery of talent management solutions ES_logo_large.jpgto architectural and engineering firms, welcomes Chuck Detling to their rapidly expanding team. Detling has over two decades of experience in the forensic engineering, consulting, technology, and legal industries. He will serve as Partner.

Detling's experience and passion for identifying needs for key investigative engineering talent and introducing the forensic engineering market to job seekers who might not have previously considered the profession as a viable career path lends itself perfectly to his new role at ExactSource, in which he will be the partner leading entry into the forensic engineering market.

“I’m proud to welcome Chuck Detling to our ExactSource team,” says Managing Partner Katy Young, “His addition and the introduction of our forensics practice area is an exciting development in our growth as we delve deeper into the markets that we serve.”

The addition of Mr. Detling and the expansion into the forensic engineering market is an organic transition for ExactSource, a firm who has always made it a top priority to stay ahead of the trends in the recruiting and A/E/C industries. Ms. Young explains, "The search industry is constantly evolving, especially with the introduction of new tools and resources in the marketplace. While many firms have found recruiting top talent to be more challenging than ever, we see this challenge as an opportunity to improve and delve deeper into markets where our expertise lies. The development of a forensics area is really just the first of many practice areas where we have a niche and expertise that others can not match."

Chuck_FE_practice_lead.png

About ExactSource:

ExactSource is a national leader in the delivery of talent solutions, software and organizational consulting to firms in the architectural and engineering sector. The company was launched in April 2012, by its sister company, Matteson Partners, one of Atlanta's leading Executive Search firms for the past 29 years. In 2014, ExactSource launched Ingenium, the premier boutique digital marketing agency for professional service firms.

ExactSource is best known in the A/E/C industry for their highly acclaimed ExactProfile technology, a system released in 2012 that assesses and catalogs more than 115 critical engineering skill sets and experience levels that aren’t typically identified on a resume. Using this breakthrough screening software, HR managers are able to instantly identify the technical candidates that meet their exact requirements. This methodology provides a smarter way to hire, and it is the objective of ExactSource to have every A/E/C firm across the country using ExactProfiles as part of the hiring process.

ExactSource brings a combined 161 years of experience in technical and leadership recruitment, and has established a prominent presence in the Engineering community. The company successfully serves firms in 39 states across the nation, including over 20 firms on the Top 500 A/E list.

For more information about ExactSource and their consulting, research, software, and recruiting services, visit their website or contact David Schmidt at dschmidt(at)exactsource(dot)com.

Click here to see the original press release, as published on PRWeb.

Topics: News from ExactSource, employees, new hires, Job Market, press release, forensic engineering

Essential Skills for Residential Architects in the Current Job Market

Posted by Dani Martinez on Tue, Sep 27, 2016 @ 13:09 PM
ESSENTIAL_SKILLS_FOR_RESIDENTIAL_ARCHITECTS_IN_THE_CURRENT_JOB_MARKET.png

 

With the Great Recession of the late 2000s behind us and the housing market returning strong, the demand for residential architects is on the rise. But a simple demand for architects isn’t enough to guarantee that you can find a job in the field.

To stay competitive and land the residential architect job of your dreams, you need a certain set of abilities to show your understanding of the field and your potential to prospective employers. The Plan Collection offers sage advice about the most essential skills for residential architects in the current job market.

Education

job_market_pic_2.jpgA great education is always going to put you a cut above the rest, but you can’t just rely on the pedigree of your alma mater to carry you through. If you’re still in school, enroll in its architecture program and become involved in any relevant student organizations. This will help you build a solid foundation of knowledge and information from which you can start building your career. The organizations can also help you meet current residential architects, from whom you can receive advice or seek out internships.

Job Experience

Any type of related job experience in the field of architecture is essential to finding a great job, so you should look for any internships or externships you can find. An internship commonly comes with a base wage or stipend, while an externship is often completely unpaid. Both are very valuable, as they will allow you to see what it’s like working at an architecture firm and gain invaluable practice putting your education to practical use. Ideally, try to get experience working in a residential architecture firm as opposed to an industrial or commercial firm.

Software Skills

Job_Market_Pic.jpgNo amount of job experience or education is going to help you if you aren’t familiar with the software programs used by residential architects. While every firm is going to have slight differences, the majority will require you to know your way around design tools such as AutoCAD and Photoshop, as well as modeling software such as Revit. According to a recent study, most top architecture firms explicitly require proficiency with these programs over traditional pencil and paper sketching.

Accreditation and Licensure

While attaining the appropriate accreditation is essential to a long-term career as a residential architect, the amount of certification you obtain depends on the position for which you are applying. Passing the Architecture Registration Examination is a major part of your accreditation, as it consists of several tests and examinations, but the good news is you can set your own schedule for taking each test as long as you meet all the necessary requirements. Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification can help distinguish you, since many top firms don’t make it a mandatory requirement for employment.

Interpersonal Skills

job_market_3.jpgIn addition to all of the technical knowledge and abilities you must possess, remember that good interpersonal skills are essential as well. As an architect, you will need to be able to communicate clearly and effectively with your coworkers, your supervisors, and quite frequently with clients and contractors as well. Never discount the benefit that good communication can have on your career.

For more information about the latest residential architecture job opportunities and training techniques, be sure to visit our Opportunities webpage.

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About The Plan Collection

The Plan Collection is a unique designer of house plans, floor plans, and home plans. Based on the principle that great design should be affordable to all, The Plan Collection brings a home buyer a realistic and detailed view of a home. Priding itself on superior customer service, The Plan Collection ensures that all of its customers receive individualized attention that caters to each client's unique and important visions.

Topics: A/E/C, communication, Architects, education, Job Skills, A/E/C Industry Trends, technical skills

ExactSource Named One of Atlanta's Best Places to Work in 2016

Posted by Sarah Walpert on Fri, Sep 16, 2016 @ 12:09 PM

ExactSource, a national leader in the delivery of talent management solutions to architectural and engineering firms, named by Atlanta Business Chronicle as one of Atlanta’s Best Places to Work for fourth year.

On September 8th, the Atlanta Business Chronicle hosted their Annual Best Places to WorkES_logo_large.jpg event, where they recognized successful companies with outstanding employee satisfaction in the Atlanta area. The award ceremony, headlined by entrepreneur, author, and endurance athlete Jesse Itzler, was sold out as attendees waited anxiously to hear which companies had earned the coveted distinction of being named one of the city's top 100 places to work.

According to event emcee Crystal Edmonson, 2016 was the most competitive year to date for the awards, with Atlanta also being the most competitive market in the country. Criteria for winning company includes offering robust reward programs for hard-working employees, an investment in vocational development and training, in addition to innovative wellness and social programs that provide opportunities for individual growth.

Among the top 100 metro-Atlanta companies honored was ExactSource, a national leader in the delivery of talent management solutions to architectural and engineering firms. The firm was named by Atlanta Business Chronicle as one of Atlanta’s Best Places to Work for fourth year.

"What an honor it is to accept this award for the fourth year," said ExactSource Chief Operating Officer, Katy Young. "Our people are second to none and I’m immensely proud of our team and the hard work they put in on a daily basis to make this one of Atlanta’s Best Places to Work."

About ExactSource:

ExactSource is a national leader in the delivery of talent solutions, software and organizational consulting to firms in the architectural and engineering sector. The company was launched in April 2012, by its sister company, Matteson Partners, one of Atlanta's leading Executive Search firms for the past 29 years. In 2014, ExactSource launched Ingenium, the premier boutique digital marketing agency for professional service firms.

ExactSource is best known in the A/E/C industry for their highly acclaimed ExactProfile technology, a system released in 2012 that assesses and catalogs more than 115 critical engineering skill sets and experience levels that aren’t typically identified on a resume. Using this breakthrough screening software, HR managers are able to instantly identify the technical candidates that meet their exact requirements. This methodology provides a smarter way to hire, and it is the objective of ExactSource to have every A/E/C firm across the country using ExactProfiles as part of the hiring process.

ExactSource brings a combined 161 years of experience in technical and leadership recruitment, and has established a prominent presence in the Engineering community. The company successfully serves firms in 39 states across the nation, including over 20 firms on the Top 500 A/E list.

For more information about ExactSource and their consulting, research, software, and recruiting services, visit their website or contact David Schmidt at dschmidt(at)exactsource(dot)com.

Topics: employees, Company Culture, press release, best places to work

The A/E/C Job Hunt: 10 Interviewing Tips You Need to Know

Posted by Dani Martinez on Mon, May 09, 2016 @ 13:05 PM

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It's a no-brainer: job interviews differ based on the industry and position you are interviewing for. An interviewee in the finance industry, for example, will be asked questions that test for required analytical knowledge. A/E/C interview questions will vary depending on the industry and discipline, but a common thread is that all employers want to know if the potential hire has the required technical skills and will fit in with the existing culture of the company.  

We've compiled a few tips and tricks to help you be more confident in your next interview. 

To Get Started:

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Everyone who's ever interviewed for a job has been asked these basic interview questions (and attempted not to roll their eyes at the interviewer): "Why should we hire you?" or  "What are your strengths and weaknesses?" 

Tip #1: Start off strong.

Try not to blow past the introductory questions. This is an opportunity for you to highlight specific areas of expertise and responsibilities you've held in the past. Are you a problem solver?  Do you take the lead in difficult situations?  What is your conflict resolution style?  They want to know that if a problem arises, you won't wait for someone else to figure it out.

Tip #2: Be honest.

When describing your weaknesses, be honest. There's no more annoying answer to this question than, "My biggest weakness is that I'm always busy because I work too hard." 

Once you get through these initial questions, the more analytical part of the interview begins, when the interviewer will assess you on a much more comprehensive level. 

Tip #3: Highlight accomplishments and skills.

 Don't forget to highlight accomplishments from all stages of your career: what you've learned in school, professional projects you've worked on, and other positions you've held.  Demonstrate a broad comprehension of relevant situations and concepts to help the interviewer understand why you're the best fit for the job. 

Getting to the Good Stuff: 

loius-vuitton-foundation.jpg

 Be prepared to answer questions about certain scenarios, good and bad, that you were previously faced with.

Tip #4: Use your past experiences to your advantage.

For example, "Describe a time when you used your engineering knowledge to solve a problem for which there appeared to be no answer?" The more you can illustrate previous circumstances in which you were resourceful, creative, and equipped to solve any problem thrown your way, the more value you will bring to a new company.

Tip #5: Communication is key.

When confronted with questions similar to, "Give an example of a time when you had to teach a skill to another engineer," demonstrate your ability to effectively communicate with others. Teaching is no easy task and being able to do so proves you are a great asset to the company. 

Tip #6: Prove your value.

"How can you best use your engineering education and prior work experience to help our company grow?" Remember, when companies hire a new employee, they are making a significant investment in that person. You want to prove your value and how you can benefit the company will make a return on their investment. Did you improve something in a previous job that expedited orders or saved thousands of dollars? Did you add to the company culture? Keep all of these examples in mind during your interview. Our company culture 

Other Things To Keep In Mind:

Tip #7: Be Prepared.

Engineering Manager Jess Sisson said, "Candidates often expect a totally verbal interview and some struggle with this, especially candidates with a relatively practical background." For example, the interviewer might show you a drawing of one of their products and ask for you to explain the basics of how it works. This could throw some off guard, but if you are prepared you can really exhibit your skill set and maybe even say how it could be improved!

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Tip #8: Be Specific.

Lastly, whether this is your first job out of college or you're a mid-level PE looking for a change of scenery, keep in mind to talk about specific work you have done. Interviewers really want to know how you contributed to a project contrary to what others achieved in the same task. 

Tip #9: Proofread Your Social Profiles.

When you apply for your job interview, don't forget about your social media. Most companies look at that first before scheduling an interview. LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and other social medias are very important websites to keep clean and professional. 

 

Tip #10: Get Started!

Ready to get the job hunt started? Look no further. ExactSource is the premier recruitment company for the A/E/C industry. Click below to browse our open positions or join our confidential candidate network here.

Job Postings

Topics: Engineers, HR, hiring engineers, new hires, hiring, Job Search, millennials, engineering graduate, recruiting millennials

The Top 25 Engineering Firms in Atlanta

Posted by Dani Martinez on Tue, Apr 12, 2016 @ 16:04 PM

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ExactSource would like to congratulate all of the firms on the Atlanta Business Chronicle's Top 25 Engineering Firms list. This list was compiled by analyzing the gross engineering billings in 2015.

We're proud to have worked with many of these firms and can attest to their excellence within the A/E/C community. 


 

1. Amec Foster Wheeler

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Engineering, environmental, consulting; EPC services for power, renewables, nuclear and government

WEBSITE:

www.amecfw.com

2. Enercon

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Engineering design, engineering modifications, engineering analysis, environmental services, environmental permitting, environmental studies

WEBSITE:

www.enercon.com

3. POND

AREAS OF EXPERTISE

Aviation/airfields, government, fueling/corrosion, transportation/traffic, education, program/construction management 

WEBSITE:

www.pondco.com

4. AECOM

AREAS OF EXPERTISE

Water/wastewater, transportation planning and engineering; environmental planning and engineering; civil site design; architecture

WEBSITE:

www.aecom.com

5. CH2M

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Environmental and nuclear; industrial and urban environments; transportation; water; oil, gas and chemicals

WEBSITE:

www.ch2m.com

6. Jacobs

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Water, wastewater, transportation, civil infrastructure, construction services, environmental

WEBSITE:

www.jacobs.com

7. Terracon Consultants

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Environmental, geotechnical, construction materials testing and special inspections, building envelope, roofing, waterproofing 

WEBSITE:

www.terracon.com

8. Applied Technical Services Inc. 

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Consulting engineering, forensic engineering, materials testing, chemical analysis, fire investigation, calibration and nondestructive inspection

WEBSITE:

www.atslab.com

9. Kimley-Horn & Associates Inc.

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Land development, landscape architecture, parking consulting

WEBSITE:

www.kimley-horn.com

10. Geosyntec Consultants Inc. 

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Site assessment and remediation, groundwater remediation, risk assessment, air quality services, toxicology

WEBSITE:

www.geosyntec.com

11. Moreland Altobelli Associates Inc. 

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Program and construction management, construction engineering and inspection, transportation planning and design, structural engineering

WEBSITE:

www.maai.net

12. Atkins North America Inc.

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Transportation planning and design; civil, structural, environmental engineering and sciences; construction services; applied technologies

WEBSITE:

www.atkinsglobal.com

13. Burns & McDonnell Engineering Co. Inc. 

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Electrical transmission and distribution, manufacturing, fueling, water treatment and watershed management, commissioning, aerospace manufacturing

WEBSITE:

www.burnsmcd.com

14. GDS Associates Inc. 

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Engineering and consulting services to the utility industry including electric, gas, water, wastewater, energy efficiency, IT

WEBSITE:

www.gdsassociates.com

15. Newcomb & Boyd

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, commissioning, lighting, acoustics, communications, security

WEBSITE:

www.newcomb-boyd.com

16. Black & Veatch

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Engineering and design, water/wastewater, energy, federal environmental, management consulting, construction, telecom

WEBSITE:

www.bv.com

17. Jordan & Skala Engineers Inc. 

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Mechanical, electrical and plumbing engineering, low-voltage and audio visual design, energy services and commissioning

WEBSITE:

www.jordanskala.com

18. Woodard & Curran

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Engineering, science, operations

WEBSITE:

www.woodardcurran.com

19. Wolverton & Associates Inc. 

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Civil engineering, land development, transportation engineering, traffic engineering. land surveying, subsurface utility engineering

WEBSITE:

www.wolverton-assoc.com

20. Brown and Caldwell Inc.

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Water/wastewater system planning, design and construction services, water resources planning, industrial water quality, business/management consulting

WEBSITE:

www.brownandcaldwell.com

21. IS International Services LLC

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Electrical engineering including system integration, from shop to floor corporate command and control

WEBSITE:

www.is-international.com

22. Golder Associates Inc. 

AREAS OF EXPERTISE: 

Hydrogeology; environmental sciences; geotechnical and civil engineering; indoor environmental quality; earth, water, and air services

WEBSITE:

www.golder.com

23. P. Marshall & Associates LLC (PM&A)

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Telecom, civil, MEP, structural, OSP/fiber

WEBSITE:

www.pmass.com

24. Gresham, Smith and Partners

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Transportation planning and design; water treatment and distribution; wastewater treatment and collection; water supply planning modeling and design

WEBSITE:

www.greshamsmith.com

25. Morrison Hershfield 

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

Building science, commissioning, mission critical facilities, telecom

WEBSITE:

www.morrisonhershfield.com


Click here to see the full list on the Atlanta Business Chronicle.


Interested in learning about what ExactSource can do for your A/E/C firm? Click the button below to learn more about our full-suite of solutions.

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Topics: Engineers, ExactSource, engineering, A/E/C, Engineer, clients, Atlanta Engineering Firms, Atlanta Business Chronicle, top engineering firms

7 Tips to Make Your LinkedIn Profile Stand Out

Posted by Cayd Harrington on Wed, Nov 04, 2015 @ 08:11 AM

Using LinkedIn is crucial for any serious job hunter. Why? Creating a solid LinkedIn profile can simplify your job search and will help hiring managers and recruiters find you. Statistics show that 90% of recruiters use LinkedIn to source candidates. Perfecting your profile can take some time, but we've got a few helpful tips to help elevate your LinkedIn profile to the next level.

1) Use Keywords

Optimizing your profile with relevant keywords will help the appropriate people find you. Keywords should be scattered throughout your profile. Keep in mind, this doesn't mean you should fill it with as many buzzwords as possible. This type of writing can be viewed as cheap and stale. For a few examples on how to utilize keywords for a more powerful LinkedIn profile, check out this job-hunting article!

2) Get Your Good Side

This one is easy: select a good profile picture that doubles as a professional headshot. A polished photo will elevate your online brand and make your profile more memorable.  Recruiters will more easily be able to remember a great candidate when they can attribute a face with a name. Being professional does not mean your photo has to be boring or stale. Have fun with this and let your personality shine through! Just a word of caution though, leave your selfie stick at home for this one!

3) Create a Custom URL

Using a custom url is a small change that can go a long way when making your profile more professional. The good news is that it only takes a moment to change. Just click on  'Edit My Public Profile'. Once there, look on the right-hand side and update your link. Its that easy!

4) Create A Headline that Stands Out

The headline in your LinkedIn profile is the line of text that runs directly below your name. It is extremely important that you take more than 30 seconds when filling this out! Wondering what makes a good headline? It should be specific, descriptive, and creative. 'Social Media Pro' is not a descriptive headline that conveys your capabilities. Go deeper. Doesn't this sound better? "Social Media Expert Creating Outstanding Content for ExactSource. 500% Increase Traffic over 3 Months." Don't just put your job title in your headline. Get creative (but as always, stay professional)!

5) Add a Summary

When it comes to writing a summary, make sure to use a fresh perspective on your work experience. Personally, I suggest having one or two of your work colleagues look it over so you can get an outside point of view. Also, it's a good idea to bullet-point the major highlights you want to stand out. This will make it easier for the reader to get a good sense of what you can do. Lastly, this is a great place to add multimedia. Whether you're highlighting your own work or just stock photos to complement your writing, it never hurts to give the reader something visual. For a more detailed look, check out this great Forbes article.

6) Promote Your Profile

Promoting your LinkedIn profile is easy, but important. Obviously, being active on LinkedIn and making connections will win you the most promotion.  Another useful tool is the profile badge.

Easily found in the 'edit profile' section, the profile badge is used as a shortcut to direct people directly to your LinkedIn. Its great to add to any resume's your sending out, blog's you may run or even a personal website. Just remember, the more connections you have on LinkedIn the better the chance your profile will be seen by someone who may hire you.

7) Be Funny

Believe it or not, recruiters are humans too! They sift through resume after resume looking for something to stand out above the rest. Adding humor can give your profile the bit of personality it was missing. Just be sure to keep the tone of your profile light, with witty quips to keep readers smiling.

To see some of our job opportunities, click below!

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Putting our BEST foot forward

Posted by Cayd Harrington on Tue, Sep 15, 2015 @ 13:09 PM

Trying on a New Look

right direction

We have the great pleasure of announcing the brand new ExactSource website! 

The new website features a more streamlined experience for clients and candidates and makes a push to be more user-friendly all around. Keeping our online visitors engaged with quality content is important, so we've spent a lot of time highlighting our new service offerings, including education, market research, employment branding, and speaking engagements.

"We've created a more streamlined user experience and built a site that offers direct integration with our software solutions," says ExactSource COO Katy Young. "Our values remain the same, but the updated website and brand reflect the vision for ExactSource moving forward."

This is an exciting time for ExactSource; we've been rapidly expanding over the last year and have added 4 key members to the executive team. We've also been busy developing ExactAcademy, an educational platform through which engineers can earn on-demand professional development hours. ExactPro, another project we recently introduced, is a skills management software solution for A/E/C firms. 

Since launching in 2012, ExactSource has built up a significant client base in the architectural and engineering industry, including 20 firms on the Top 500 A/E list. Be sure to check out the new web design here and let us know what you think! http://www.exactsource.com

 

About ExactSource:

exact source

ExactSource is the leading recruiting, organizational consulting, market research, and software solutions company providing services to firms in the Architectural and Engineering sector.

ExactSource is best known in the A/E/C industry for their highly acclaimed ExactProfile technology, a system released in 2012 that assesses and catalogs more than 115 critical engineering skill sets and experience levels that aren’t typically identified on a resume. Using this breakthrough screening software, HR managers are able to instantly identify the technical candidates that meet their exact requirements. This methodology provides a smarter way to hire and it is the objective of ExactSource to have every A/E/C firm across the country using ExactProfiles as part of the hiring process.

For more information about ExactSource and their consulting, research, and recruiting services, visit their website or contact David Schmidt at dschmidt@exactsource.com.

Want more? Click below to learn more about ExactAcademy and its PDH online credits!

  Go to ExactAcademy

Topics: News from ExactSource, ExactSource, ExactAcademy, office, ExactPro, website, branding

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